Topics

 Questions & Answers


AddressBack To Top

How do I get an address for the property that I just purchased?
You may visit the Planning & Development website or contact Planning & Development at (520) 866-6442.


BidsBack To Top

Are your RFQ published on line? Do you have a mailing list? If not, can you tell me where I might get information on current RFQ listings?
For more information regarding any questions concerning the dates for Requests for Proposals (RFQ), Statements of Qualifications (SOQ), or Hard Dollar Bids for upcoming projects, you may visit the Contracts webpage or contact 520-509-3555 and ask for the Contracts Administrator.

How can I get on a Bid or Vendor List or get vendor application and procurement process information for upcoming projects?
Contact Pinal County's Purchasing Dept. to solicit your product and be listed as a vendor on a bid list.


BondsBack To Top

I need to get a bond released.
Please contact Development Review at 520-866-6940 to start the process


BurningBack To Top

Can I burn trash or vegetation at my house?
You can contact Pinal County Air Quality to obtain a burning permit and any rules and regulations regarding trash burning.


ContractsBack To Top

Where can I find information regarding upcoming projects in Pinal County and how to submit a bid?
You may find this information on the Contracts webpage or contact 520-509-3555 and ask for the Contracts Administrator.


County Standards / RegulationsBack To Top

How do I obtain Subdivision Regulations & Requirements, Pinal County Road Standards, Speed Hump Ordinance or a Pinal County Area Master Drainage Plan?
These can be obtained by going to the Public Works website or Contact 520-509-3555.


Desert / Illegal DumpingBack To Top

Where do I report desert dumping?
Pinal County has a Desert Dumping Hot Line for quick reporting: (520) 866-6400. Please provide as much detail as possible such as the location, what has been discarded, and your name and number.
You may also contact 520-509-3555 and ask for the Environmental Investigations Section to speak with one of our Investigators.


Development ReviewBack To Top

How do I schedule a meeting with Development Review staff?
Please contact Development Review at 520-509-3555.


ElevationBack To Top

Where do I find the Grading and Drainage Elevations for a parcel?
This information is found in the Grading and Drainage Plans.


EmergenciesBack To Top

How can I get the latest information on any other emergency bulletins?
You may find information regarding Human and Emergency Services such as emergency preparedness, homeland security, wildfires, health matters at the Arizona Emergency Services Association website.

How can I get the latest information on road closures?

If the road is a county maintained road, you may contact the Road Conditions Hot Line at (520) 866-6078 or check for road conditions on our website at Current News Release.

Current county road projects are listed on our Transportation Projects page.

If the road is a state highway, you may contact Arizona Department of Transportation or call 511.

An additional source of emergency information, whether wildfire, flood, road closures, or other hazards, is the Arizona Emergency Information Network.

For assistance with local emergencies, call 911.
For assistance with local emergencies, call 911.


FeesBack To Top

How do I obtain a copy of the Fee Schedule?
You may find the Plan Review Fee Schedule and the Plan Subbmittal Form on the Public Works website or contact Development Review at 520-866-6940 for any other questions on fees or plan submittal.

How do I get information on Permitting Fees and requirements?
This information may be obtained by going to the Public Works website or call 520-509-3555 for permitting information regarding roads or working in the County Right-of-Way.


FireBack To Top

If a fire hydrant is located in the County and not within city limits, who is responsible for painting and maintenance of the hydrants?
Fire hydrants are the property of the private water utility company. It is their responsibility to paint and maintain the fire hydrants.

Who is the County Fire Marshall?
The County Fire Marshall is the Building Safety Director. The County Fire Marshall has jurisdiction over any area in the County that is not within a fire district and as long as the structure is not a public building. If the structure is a public building, the State Fire Marshall has jurisdiction.


FissuresBack To Top

What are earth fissures?
Earth fissures are tension cracks that open as the result of subsidence due to severe overdrafts (i.e., pumping) of groundwater. As the ground slowly settles, cracks form at depth and propagate towards the surface, hundreds of feet above. Individual fissures range in length from hundreds of feet to several miles, and from less than an inch to several feet wide.
Rainstorms can erode fissure walls rapidly causing them to widen and lengthen suddenly, and dangerously, to form gullies 5 - 15 feet wide and tens of feet deep.
For more information on earth fissures in Arizona, visit the Arizona Geological Survey site.


FloodBack To Top

Who can prepare an Elevation Certificate?
Elevation Certificates must be prepared and certified by either a land surveyor, engineer, or architect who is authorized by commonwealth, state, or local law to certify elevation information. The Flood Control District may also sign the certificate.

What is a FIRM?
A FIRM is a Flood Insurance Rate Map. It is issued by FEMA to show the 100- and 500-year floodplains, BFEs, and risk premium zones are delineated to enable insurance agents to issue accurate flood insurance policies to homeowners in communities participating in the NFIP.

What is a Flood Control District?
The Flood Control District is a special district whose purpose is to work Countywide to reduce the damage from flooding events.

What is a BFE?

Why would I need flood insurance?
The majority of Americans are unaware that homeowner's insurance policies do not cover them for damages associated with flooding, yet flooding is more common than fire damage. Would you ever think of not having fire insurance? Contact your insurance agent and ask about obtaining flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program.

What is the difference between Flood Plain Administration and Flood Control?
Floodplain management is the operation of a community program of corrective and preventative measures for reducing flood damage. These measures take a variety of forms and generally include requirements for zoning, subdivision or building, and special-purpose floodplain ordinances.
 
The term "flood control" refers to all methods used to reduce or prevent the detrimental effects of flood waters. Pinal County Flood Control District has implemented several methods to reduce or prevent the effects of flood waters.

What is the 100-year floodplain?

The 100-year floodplain is defined as the area that would be covered by floodwater during a 100-year storm event. In stormwater managements, floods are classified by statistical probability of occurrence. When we speak of a 100-year flood, we are referring to a flood event that has a one percent chance of occurring in any given year. The magnitude of a 100-year flood is determined from historical data and precipitation patterns within the watershed.

Floodplain boundaries vary along a channel depending on such factors as topography, soils and vegetation, the size of the watershed, and the condition of the channel. These boundaries may also change over time as the watershed is developed or the channel is altered. In addition, the floodplain may be redefined as new or revised statistical data becomes available.


What do I need to know if my building is in a floodplain?

Buildings in special flood hazard areas shown on FIRMs may be damaged when flooding occurs. Some buildings flood frequently, while others get damaged by only the more severe events. If your home is in the 1% annual chance floodplain, it has a 26% chance of getting flooded over a 30-year period. This means it is about five times more likely to get damaged by flood than by a severe fire!

You should know that usually you can get federal flood insurance, if available, by contacting your regular homeowners insurance agent. FEMA and others recommend that everyone in special flood hazard areas buy flood insurance. If you buy a home or refinance your home, your mortgage lender or banker may require flood insurance. But, even if not required, it is a good investment especially in areas that flood frequently or where flood forces are likely to cause major damage. 80% of flood damage occurs outside of the floodplain.

Another thing you should know is that your community may require permits for remodeling, improving, expanding, or rebuilding your building. In order to reduce long-term flood damage, the NFIP requires that buildings that are substantially improved or substantially damaged become compliant. This means if the cost of the improvements or repairs is more than 50% of the market value of the building, you will have to make it compliant with the rules for floodplain construction. Usually, this means lifting it off the foundation and elevating it above the predicted flood level. If you carry a flood insurance policy and have major flood damage, you may be eligible for up to $20,000 to help pay for the cost of this work.


The map shows that my lot is in the mapped floodplain, but the ground my house is on is higher. I believe I shouldn't be shown in the floodplain. What are FEMA's requirements for being removed from the 1% annual chance flood hazard area?

To be removed from the floodplain shown on the Flood Insurance Rate Map, a structure must be on land that is not subject to flooding by the 1% annual chance flood. Remember, more severe floods can and do happen, so even if your home is found to be on high ground, it may still be damaged by an extreme flood event.

If your lot or building site is on natural ground that is higher than the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) shown on the FIRM, then you may request a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA). To support your request, you will have to get a surveyor to determine the elevation of the ground next to your building and complete an Elevation Certificate. If the ground is higher than the BFE, then FEMA will issue a LOMA. With a LOMA, your lender may choose to not require flood insurance.

If your home was built on fill that was placed after the FIRM was prepared, you may request a Letter of Map Revision Based on Fill (LOMR-F). As with a LOMA, you will need to get an Elevation Certificate completed by a land surveyor. If the filled ground is higher than the BFE, and if you do not have a basement, then FEMA may issue a LOMR-F, and your lender may choose to not require flood insurance.


What is fill and how does it affect the floodplain?
For the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), fill refers to soil that is brought in to raise the level of the ground. Depending on where the soil is placed, fill may change the flow of water or increase flood elevations. Fill may be used to elevate a building to meet the NFIP requirements. Sometimes fill is combined with other methods of elevation such as pilings or foundation walls. Placement of fill requires a Floodplain Use permit from the Flood Control District.

What is a "floodway"? What does it mean when homes or land are in the floodway?

Rivers and streams where FEMA has prepared detailed engineering studies may also have designated floodways. For most waterways, the floodway is where the water is likely to be deepest and fastest. It is the area of the floodplain that should be reserved (kept free of obstructions) to allow floodwaters to move downstream. Placing fill or buildings in a floodway may block the flow of water and increase flood heights. Because of this, your community will require that you submit engineering analyses before it approves permits for development in the floodway.

If your home is already in the floodway, you may want to consider what you will do if it is damaged. If it is substantially damaged (the costs to repair equal or exceed 50% of the market value of the building) your community will require that you bring it into compliance. In most cases, this means you will have to elevate it above the base flood elevation. Because placing fill dirt in the floodplain can make flooding worse, you'll probably have to elevate on columns, pilings or raised foundation walls. If your land is large enough to have a site outside of the floodway or even out of the floodplain, you may want to think about moving your home to a safer location.



Garbage DisposalBack To Top

How do we get garbage delivery set up at my house?
Pinal County Public Works does not provide any garbage service. Check with your neighbors, or the nearest town hall / Chamber of Commerce to see who services your area.
There are several landfill locations and recycling locations within driving distance that offer services to local residents. Residents are encouraged to locate the resources near them and to get involved in community clean ups. Illegal dumping is against the law. To report dumping activity or sites with an accumulation of trash that could create an environmental issue, contact the Illegal Dumping Hot Line: (520) 866-6400.

Where do I find the Grading and Drainage Elevations for a parcel?
This information is found in the Grading and Drainage Plans.


Hazardous WasteBack To Top

Where can I dispose of hazardous waste?
Pinal County's recycling program is no longer accepting hazardous waste at the Adamsville Road location.
To find the nearest Recycling or Re-use location in your area to dispose of hazardous waste, please go to www.earth911.org.


LandfillsBack To Top

Does Pinal County own / operate the landfills?
Pinal Co. no longer owns or operates any landfills. Waste Management Inc. now operates the landfills in Pinal County. A list of landfill locations are posted on the Public Works site.

In addition to the free disposal, Pinal County also provides 5 drop-off locations for white appliances and waste tires at the following locations at no cost to the local residents.
The drop-off locations are listed on the Public Works Waste Tire webpage.


PermitsBack To Top

When I call the County for permitting information, how do I know what department will permit what I need?
Building Permits, go to Building Safety website or call 520 866-6455.
Site Plan Permits, go to Planning & Development website or call 520 866-6442.
Burn and Dust Control Permits, go to Air Quality website or call 520 866-6929.
Food, Water / Sewer Permits, go to Environmental Health website or Call 520 866-6864.
Road and Utility Permits, go to Public Works website or call 520-509-3555.


Plan SubmittalsBack To Top

Can I talk to the reviewer that reviewed my plans?
If you have any questions on your plans that were reviewed and or questions on the review comments, please contact the Development Review staff at 520-509-3555.

Is my agenda item on the Board of Supervisors next meeting?
You may review the upcoming Pinal County Board of Supervisors’ agenda on the County website at Board of Supervisors Agenda Schedule or contact Planning and Development at 520-866-6464 for any Board of Supervisor scheduling.

Can I have the phone number to the outside reviewer?
In an effort to keep the review process moving forward, we do not release contact information for our outside reviewers. If you have any questions or concerns about a reviewer or review comments, you may contact the Development Review staff at 520-509-3555.

How can I get the status update of plans that are in for review?
Call Development Review at 520-866-6940 for status.

How do I obtain a copy of a set of plans or plat?
Please contact Development Review at 520-866-6940.


Population StatisticsBack To Top

What is the current population of Pinal County?
The Arizona Workforce Informer provides current and historical data.


RecyclingBack To Top

How can I get recycling bins in my area?
Contact the Material Recovery Center recycling staff at (520) 866-6685 or  (520) 866-6682.

I am interested in recycling, where can I get information about what to recycle and where to drop it off?
Visit the Public Works Recycling website for further information.


Right-Of-WayBack To Top

What do I need to do to perform work in the county right-of-way?
You will need to obtain and complete a Right-of-Way Use Permit Application. If a Utility company is doing the work, you will need the Requirements for Utility Permit Submittal and the Utility Right-of-Way Application. Otherwise, you will need the Requirements for Non-Utility Permit Submittal and the Non-Utility Right-of-Way Application. For further questions or concerns, please contact the Permits / Inspection Section of Public Works at 520-509-3555. The application along with the application fee can be delivered to Pinal County Public Works, 31 N. Pinal Street, Building F, Florence, AZ., or mailed to Pinal County Public Works, P.O. Box 727, Florence, AZ, 85132.

What do I need to do to install a culvert / driveway in the right-of-way?
  1. You will need to obtain and complete a Non-Utility permit application. Depending on the "scope of work" the permittee may be required to submit engineered plans. You may obtain the Non-Utility requirements and Non-Utility permit application form online. If you have further questions, please contact the Permit/Inspection Section at 520-509-3555.

How do I get legal access or right-of-way / easement information about my property?
Pinal County Public Works does not have this information. All dedicated easements should be referenced or noted on the back of the property deed. The Assessor's office can provide the recording information, and the Recorder's office can provide copies of the documents. If a Title Report was done when the property was purchased, all of the information will be included in that report. A private title company can do a title search on your property to determine this information.

What is the road easement on my property? Also is there any other easements or set backs power, water, etc.?

This is public information and easily accessible.

All dedicated easements should be referenced or noted on the back of the property deed. The Assessor's office can provide the recording information, and the Recorder's office can provide copies of the documents. If a Title Report was done when the property was purchased all of the information will be included in that report.

All setback requirements can be obtained by going to the Planning & Development website or calling (520) 866-6442.


Does the County have an updated list of "Construction Notes" for sewer improvement plans within the public right-of-way?
Standard construction notes required by the county can be obtained from the Subdivision and Infrastructure Design Manual.


RoadsBack To Top

How can I find out about road condition / closures?
Pinal County provides online information on county road projects as well as county road closures. The Road Conditions Hotline at (520) 866-6078 will provide information on county road closures as well.
For State Highways, dial 511 or visit the Arizona Department of Transportation website.

I live in a subdivision. Who is responsible for the roads within the subdivision?
This depends on if the county has a maintenance agreement with the subdivision or the streets within the subdivision have been adopted by the Pinal County Board of Supervisors as county maintained. Contact the Road Maintenance Section at or 520-509-3555.

How can I get my county-maintained road graded?
Call 520-509-3555 and ask for the Road Maintenance Section.

How do I know if a road is a county road or not?
Call 520-509-3555 and ask for the Road Maintenance Section.

I have a question regarding current roadway road resurfacing and/or construction projects, who can I speak with?
You may visit the Contracts webpage or contact 520-509-3555 and ask for the Contracts section for inquiries on current and upcoming project bids & solicitations. Roadway construction projects are now online for your convenience. You may contact the Pavement Management Coordinator at 520-509-3555 regarding the road resurfacing projects.

I need a traffic count, who do I talk to?

Call 520-509-3555 and ask for the Transportation Planning Section.


How do I know if a road is maintained by the county?
Call 520-509-3555 and ask for the Road Maintenance Section.

If the road adjacent to my property is a private road and I need to gain access to my property from that road, what do I need to do?
Once the road has been identified as a private road, to determine ownership of that road you would need to order a "Title Search" thru a local title company.

How can I bring a dirt road up to county standards so that it can be maintained?
  1. County Right-of-Way (ROW) must exist or be dedicated and accepted by the County to accommodate the new roadway and be in accordance with A.R.S. 28-6705. Access must be continuous from an existing county paved roadway.

  2. If County ROW includes existing utilities, Bluestake shall be contacted prior to any excavation for roadway construction. The contractor constructing the roadway shall be responsible for repair or relocation existing utilities if conflict is caused by construction of subject road. There shall be no obstructions or steep slope / drop offs within the clear zone from the edge of the traveled way as determined by PWD.

  3. Subject road must be brought up to Pinal County Minimum Standard for Design & Construction of Highways & Roads outside Subdivision Boundaries approved September 30, 1998 – using Standard L-2 per attached drawing. It may be necessary depending on the complexity of the project as determined by PWD for a Civil Engineer currently licensed in the State of Arizona to prepare a drainage report and design construction plans to be in conformance with County Drainage Ordinance. A ROW Permit shall be obtained by a contractor licensed to perform business in the State of Arizona from PWD. Drainage issues must be addressed by importing acceptable material, installation of dip sections and/or storm drain culverts as shown on plans submitted by contractor.

  4. After ROW permit is obtained, Contractor shall abide by all permit requirements and be responsible to give PWD inspection section advance notice to inspect project at appropriate stages of construction as determined by PWD. If said permit requirements are met, the roadway may be accepted by the County Engineer for courtesy maintenance by PWD. All costs associated with bringing the roadway up to Pinal County minimum standards would be the responsibility of the property owners. These costs include but are not limited to donation of ROW, design preparation, possible utility relocation, plan review, permit fees, and construction.


How can I get a road paved?
Road Resurfacing Process can be found under the Brochures area of the Public Works website.

What is a Road Improvement District?
A road improvement district is a special taxing district authorized by Arizona Revised Statutes. These districts are formed for special purposes, and the specific legislation is covered in ARS Article 48, Chapter 6. Specific sections are covered in ARS 48-901 through 48-1070.

How can I find out when meetings are scheduled regarding road improvements and highways in my District?
To locate meetings in your District, go to Transportation Advisory Committee (TAC) meetings.

How can I get a Pinal County Road Map?
Pinal County does not currently produce any road maps. Wide World of Maps produces the most comprehensive road map of Pinal County. Look for it in your local grocery store or at the nearest shopping center.
Wide World of Maps
2626 W. Indian School Rd.
Phoenix, AZ 85017
(602) 279-2323
www.maps4u.com

How can I get my Civil Group or organization to sign up for the County’s Adopt-A-Highway Program for roadside litter pickup?
You may print an Adopt-A-Highway Application from the Public Works website. For further assistance in processing this application, please contact the Public Response Section Chief at (520) 866-6682.


Signs / StripingBack To Top

I live in a subdivision. Who is responsible for signs, striping, and or street lights within the subdivision?
This depends on if the county has a maintenance agreement with the subdivision or the streets within the subdivision have been adopted by the Pinal County Board of Supervisors as county maintained. Contact the Road Maintenance Section at 520-509-3555.

Who maintains signs and traffic lights?
If the traffic sign or light is within city limits, contact that City’s Public Works Department. If the traffic sign or light is outside of city limits and not an Indian Reservation, contact Pinal County Public Works Traffic / Signage Section for further clarification at 520 866-6385.

I have a question about striping, street signs or other signs, who do I contact?
Call 520-866-7385 to speak with someone in the Public Works Signage Section.


UtilitiesBack To Top

If a fire hydrant is located in the County and not within city limits, who is responsible for painting and maintenance of the hydrants?
Fire hydrants are the property of the private water utility company. It is their responsibility to paint and maintain the fire hydrants.

Who do I call about my utilities?
Pinal County does not provide utilities to the public. If you live within a city or town, please contact your city government for more information. Privately owned utility companies provide this service to the residents who live outside of the city limits within Pinal County. You may want to check with a neighbor to find out who services your area.


Water ShedBack To Top

Who can I talk to about a wash on my property?
Prior to construction on the property or if your property has flooded, please contact the Pinal County Flood Control District at 520-509-3555.

My neighbor has filled in or changed the direction of a wash that affects my property, who can I talk to about this?
Please contact Flood Control District at 520-509-3555.